proserveit case study

ProServeIT Helping a leading Microsoft Partner stand out online

ProServeIT is a multi-award-winning Microsoft Canada Gold Partner and Citrix Partner. Offering managed services, customer software development, IT service desk, and technology consulting services, they were one of the first Canadian companies to spearhead cloud computing and they have migrated over 200,000 users to the cloud.

ProServeIT had won a steady stream of work via referral. However, they wanted to gain more work organically through their website, and so turned to Fifty Five and Five to help develop a consistent SEO strategy that would help them reach new audiences and win more leads.

A close partnership for successful SEO

Our SEO experts worked closely with ProServeIT's in-house marketing team to help develop an SEO strategy that would help them achieve their goals. We have developed a close relationship where we regularly provide advice and guidance on changes and improvements ProServeIT can make, as well as carrying out optimisation of their website.

ProserveIT case study

Success with SEO is about long term, incremental improvement. Every month, we carry out regular work on ProServeIT's website to help shift individual pages, and the website as a whole, up the search rankings for their target keywords. We also produce a detailed monthly report where ProServeIT can monitor the work we have been doing and the results of that work. This report includes:

  • Data on search traffic
  • An update on unique users
  • Reviewing time spent on the website and user journeys
  • Checking keyword rankings
  • Monitoring leads

We also provide additional advice and guidance for ProServeIT's marketing team, keeping them up to date in latest SEO trends and updates.

A steady rise in traffic, time spent on page and leads

Success with organic SEO is something of a 'long game', yet the results of Fifty Five and Five's work with ProServeIT demonstrate how much impact a consistent strategy can have. For instance, one metric our reports cover is unique website users. 10 months after beginning our engagement with ProServeIT, the number of unique monthly users increased by 58%.

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how to get a featured snippet

How to get a featured snippet for your website

  • What are featured snippets?
  • How can you get your content in a Google featured snippet? 
  • How tech companies can benefit from getting content into featured snippets

A featured snippet is coveted by content writers and web developers alike, across almost all industries and disciplines. That’s because, when your content is featured as a ‘snippet’ in Google search engine results, you can expect a lot more traffic to come through to your site. Even if your blog isn’t the number one search result, if the result is framed by a box, it is more likely to draw the user’s attention. That should mean it will be read and clicked on by a lot of people who are in the market for what you are selling.

What is a featured snippet?

It is simply a featured section of content from a web page that is relevant to the terms or phrase searched for. Usually, it appears at the top of the search results page, highlighted in a text box. If you use Google (and really, who doesn’t!) you’ve seen them. If you haven’t, ask your search engine a question: “how to write a tech blog?” for example. The results will likely contain a featured snippet in a text box giving you a quick answer to your query.

The goal or purpose of a featured snippet is to provide the user with a quick answer to their question, saving them having to read through many different webpages.

According to reports, about 12.29% of search results have featured snippets on the results page. If you can optimise your content so that your search engine will decide it answers a question, you massively boost your chances of readers visiting your website.

how to get a featured snippet

 

Most featured snippets serve to answer public queries quickly in as few words as possible, by search engines extracting related information from all online content. Therefore, tailoring your content to answer a specific question will massively boost your chances of readers visiting your website.

Getting your content into a featured snippet?

There is no exact formula for guaranteeing a featured snippet of your content, especially as Google’s search algorithm continues to evolve. However, there are certain measures you can take to give yourself the best chance.

  • Find keywords you’re currently ranking highly for
  • Choose a page to optimise for an answer box
  • Choose the kind of answer box you want to rank for
  • Edit the copy to be ‘answer box- friendly

4 tips on how to get a featured snippet in Google for your content:

1. Find keywords you’re currently ranking on page 1

Search engines like Google will extract its featured snippets from the top ten ranked web pages. You don’t have to be the first ranked page to get a featured snippet. It can extract answers from any of the ten organic results on page one. So, even if your page is at the bottom of the first page, with the right optimisation Google is still likely to extract your information and turn it into a featured snippet.

Choose blogs or web pages you currently rank on the top page for. To do this use an analytics software site like Moz. If you don’t rank on the top page, you need to get there first. Do this by optimising your content. See our other posts to help you with this.

2. Select a page to optimise for a snippet

A blog on company news, or an update to your product, probably won’t be right for answer box optimisation. You will likely need a page that answers a question. Choose a page and tweak if necessary to improve its SEO optimisation.

3. Change the copy to be more appropriate for a featured snippet

The most important thing to know about optimising content to be answer box-friendly is that, at present, the featured snippet algorithm seems to be less sophisticated than Google’s more general search algorithm. Using specific formatting headers like H2 and H3 can help Google to see your information as a featured snippet.

So, make your content as simple as possible for the best chance at netting a featured snippet. For relevant content to be extracted, it’s a good idea to state what the content on the page is about in a way that is understandable. This especially goes for technical content that can sometimes be difficult to grasp. Turning a piece of content from a detailed review of a work process that contains all the right information into a ‘Top 5 process best practice’ article is a good example. By using a list format to simplify your content, you are making the content more snippet-optimal.

4. Optimise your current content

  • Rename your blog titles to include words like ‘how to’
  • Use numbered lists
  • Write copy which clearly shows that the content is an answer to something. For example: “how to” or “easy ways to”
  • Write a short title or introductory sentence which includes your keyword, immediately before the content you wish to be in the featured snippet – that could be a list, a paragraph or a table.

The featured snippet bump

A featured snippet for your keywords could be a serious boost to your page visits, which directly correlates to the number of leads you can expect to receive. Our clients are tech organisations, who are predominantly part of the Microsoft Partner Network and we believe that these companies are really missing out on the huge ROI that featured snippets can offer them.

So if you think your company could do more to optimise its search results and get a greater return from its marketing, get in touch and see how we can help.

 


Fifty Five and Five are a full-service digital marketing agency, guiding clients through the entirety of the content process—from ideation and creation to distribution and analytics. For more information, get in touch with us today.

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prosymmetry case study

ProSymmetry A sleek and modern website for a leading ISV.

A cool vendor for 2016

ProSymmetry are the people behind Tempus Resource, a resource management tool that helps Project Managers model their project data. Identified as a ‘Cool Vendor’ by analyst Gartner, ProSymmetry enables companies of any size to make data-driven resource decisions.

prosymmetry case study

Web, social campaigns and content

We began working with ProSymmetry to modernise their website, and our relationship has developed to the point that we provide them with the ‘full works’ of our digital marketing offering. Since we upgraded their website, we now maintain it and keep it fresh with regular blogging and SEO management. We also help them tell their story with high value content in the form of whitepapers and eBooks, along with lead nurturing email and social campaigns. Our monthly reports and site performance analysis mean they can see the impact of the work we're doing.

ProSymmetry target the niche field of Resource Management, so they needed an agency that can understand the complexities of this specialism, and produce content that feels authoritative and relevant for a very specific audience. We know how to speak to that audience in a way that engages them and our marketing has helped grow traffic to ProSymmetry's website and the number of leads acquired through their digital channels.

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what is Google AMP

Google AMP has hit the mainstream. And marketers better play along

  • Google announces new project called Accelerated Mobile Pages
  • AMP-optimised pages will now rank as top pages in Google search
  • Google partners with developers, social platforms and publishers

From time to time, the world’s biggest classified ads company changes the way it shows content to its users. When Google updates its results algorithms, the impact on content publishers, and your strategy for promoting content online, can be pretty big. The end of January saw the arrival of the latest of this kind of update.

Search engine software firm Rank Ranger released a report last Monday showed how a relatively new project named Google AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages), which was first put into play during February 2016, has now ‘hit the mainstream’. Rank Ranger’s study shows that fast-loading AMP-optimized web pages have made a huge leap from making up about 25% of Google’s top-ranked news stories in the previous weeks, to now appearing as ‘top stories’ around 75% of the time.

This suggests that pages which have been AMP-optimised are being prioritised by Google. For content publishers, this change indicates that your content will be less likely to appear at the top of Google’s search results if it’s not AMP-optimised.

Remind me, what is Google AMP?

A detailed summary of AMP, plus guidance on how to create AMP pages can be found at the AMP Project website. But in sum:

  • Google has worked in partnership with developers, the main social media platforms and major publishers to implement a new protocol for how good mobile web pages should be designed.
  • This project was inspired by figures which suggest that mobile consumption of content is now greater than traditional desktop-based content consumption. Up to 60% of searches online are performed from a mobile device and also more than 50% of digital media consumption happens on a smartphone or tablet.
  • As a result, Google and others have gone about designing a new kind of web page which is more lightweight and loads faster on mobile devices. The main feature of AMP-optimised pages is that they load the content that is ‘above the fold’ of the user’s screen first, before subsequently loading content that comes further down the article. This means that for the user, it feels like the page loads instantaneously, with no clunky load time at all.

In many ways, AMP-optimised content is great. As Google themselves explain, AMP is, in theory, good for everyone:

Consumers can read the content they want to read faster, without having to wait while clumsy pages load slowly.

Publishers: reduce the risk of the reader leaving their website (and not seeing those revenue-driving ads) because of a slow-loading page.

Platforms: social media firms can be confident that AMP-optimised pages will also load faster for their users, meaning they will be more likely to visit pages and, similarly, drive ad-revenue.

So, everyone wins, right? Well, yes, in theory—as long as you play along. For firms that don’t have someone in-house who can optimise their web pages for AMP (admittedly, it shouldn’t be incredibly difficult to do for most publishers), it will bring about some short-term costs.

Besides that, Rank Ranger’s report shows, Google are making a drive to push AMP-optimised pages to the top of the results lists in Google News. Some might criticise Google for apparently prioritising large publishers who have the means to AMP-optimise their content.

And for anyone who’s not a traditional publisher, AMP will also affect you. To begin with, AMP was mainly adopted by big news outlets like the BBC, The Guardian or The Wall Street Journal, although non-news websites did begin to embrace it a few years ago. The signs were that Google would not actually place AMP-optimised pages higher than any other content (although, bear in mind that Google does take website mobile speed into account during its ranking process in any case). However, the sudden boost in Google News results reported by Rank Ranger does seem to suggest that, for news at least, being AMP-optimised helps a lot.

The writing's on the wall?

For smaller publishers, Google’s apparent pushing of AMP should come as a clear signal about what you need to do for your content strategy in the coming years.

For major publishers, AMP obviously makes a lot of sense, especially for those that depend on ad-revenue. For businesses which use content marketing as part of their SEO and marketing strategy, the AMP update could be a bit of a pain. Regardless of the pros and cons, the fact of the matter is that AMP has hit the mainstream, and you better play along if you want to keep appearing high up in their search results.

Don’t have time to keep up with all these changes? Fifty Five and Five can help you with your digital marketing strategy and best practice SEO, keeping your company’s content optimised and outperforming the competition. 

The SEO experts here at Fifty Five and Five keep are keeping constantly up to date with the latest trends and changes in the world of SEO to create the best possible campaigns and improve rankings for our clients. Get in touch with us to find out more.

Looking to improve your SEO?

We can help! Talk to us about your business and the specific barriers you come up against when trying to generate leads.

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How to get a Google answer box in 4 simple steps

  • How can you get your content in a Google answer box? 
  • What are Google Answer Boxes?
  • Opportunities tech companies should exploit

A couple of months ago, I was becoming increasingly obsessed with getting a Fifty Five and Five blog featured in a Google answer box (AKA ‘position zero’, AKA ‘rich answers’ AKA ‘featured snippet’).

I’d been pestering our SEO team for tips. I’d been prodding the web designer to change code on pages. I’d been getting on the writers’ nerves asking them to edit old blogs.

It had become a bit of a joke in the office.

The worst part about it? We did briefly have a Google answer box a couple of months earlier after I'd spent half an hour optimising some of our older blogs. Here’s that featured snippet in all its glory, linking to a blog about B2B marketing:

Google answer box

But a couple of days later, I searched around that topic again (“how to write a B2B technology blog”), and although Fifty Five and Five still got the first result in the rankings, we’d lost the answer box.

And so, an obsession was born.

Why did the Google answer box disappear? What did I learn trying to reinstate that featured snippet? And how can you get one?

Before we go any further, you’ll be delighted to hear I  managed to get the answer box back for that page (plus a few more since!). So, what did I do?

What is a Google answer box? A quick primer

If you use Google, you’ll be familiar with answer boxes. They normally appear at the top of a page (although can appear further down) in a box. Answer boxes also usually appear when your search is posed as a question: How do I…; What is…; When did…; etc.

The aim of a Google answer box is to provide the user with a quick answer to their question and save them having to read through many different pages to find the answer.

Features of a Google answer box

Cognitive SEO, a company who provide SEO-tools, carried out an excellent study (read it here) with thousands of search queries to get an overview of how the algorithm works. Some of the key findings include:

  • There’s a Google answer box in about 17% of all searches
  • About a fifth of answer box answers are provided by Google’s own widgets – think translations, dictionary definitions or monetary exchange calculators
  • 5% get definitions from other websites (which has led to accusations that Google pushes ‘fake news’)
  • 5% are video widgets
  • 69% are extracted content from websites

It’s that last 69% that is interesting to marketing managers and website bloggers. If you can optimise your content so that Google will decide it answers a question, you massively boost your chances of readers visiting your website (as this article from industry publication Search Engine Watch shows). More traffic is obviously good news.

How can you optimise your content to get an answer box?

At present, no one seems to have worked out an exact formula that can guarantee you will get an answer box. And, as I discovered after my first bit of success, getting an answer box once doesn’t guarantee you’ll always hold that position.

Nonetheless, I’ve done a lot of reading around the topic, and below are my findings about what seems to work if you want to optimise for an answer box.

Here’s how to get a Google answer box

  1. Find keywords you’re currently ranking on page 1 for
  2. Choose a page to optimise for an answer box
  3. Choose the kind of answer box you want to rank for
  4. Edit the copy to be answer box friendly

So, here’s how you can optimise for an answer box in four steps:

1.  Find keywords you’re currently ranking on page 1 for

Google will extract its answer boxes from pages on the top ten rankings (i.e. page 1). Most often, it seems to extract answers from the first ranking result. But, it can extract answers from any of the ten organic results on page one. So, even if you come tenth, but have optimised your content so Google is more likely to extract information and turn it into an answer box, you can leapfrog the competition.

Therefore, you need to choose blogs or web pages you currently rank on page one for, using a tool like Moz. If you don’t rank on page one for any keywords, focus on improving your SEO.

How I did this

We rank on page one for several keywords, and one of those is “B2B technology blog”. It’s a niche keyword, but our customers work in the B2B tech sector, so it makes sense for us.

2.  Choose a page to optimise for an answer box

You may well have a few different pages which appear on page one of Google. However, not all of them will be obvious candidates for Google answer box. For instance, a blog on company news, or an update to your product, probably won’t be right for answer box optimisation (we think this kind of boring, traditional blog is dead anyway).

Why?

Because they don’t answer a question.

You need to choose a page which either answers an obvious question, or which you think could be tweaked to do so.

How I did this

I chose a blog originally called, “Seven simple steps for writing great B2B technology blog posts”. It seemed like a sensible page to choose and with a slight tweak could be changed to answer an obvious question. Today, the blog is called “How to write B2B technology blog posts: 7 simple steps” – we’ll see why below.

3.  Choose the kind of answer box you want to rank for

If you’ve spent any time researching answer boxes, you’ve likely noticed that there are different kinds of extracted text – paragraphs, lists and tables. A study by Stat, an SEO analytics house, showed how often each of these three types of extracted text appear:

  • Paragraphs – about 82% of the time
  • Lists (either numbered or bulleted) – about 11% of the time,
  • Tables – about 7% of the time

Google will extract content from your page to appear in one of these three formats. It’s wise to decide at this stage which approach you want to take, as it will shape how you optimise your content in the next step.

How I did this

As noted above, I chose a blog which was an obvious candidate for a list-style answer box (“Seven simple steps…”). So, optimising for a list was an easy choice for me.

4.  Edit the copy to be Google answer box friendly

The most important thing to know about optimising content to be answer box friendly is that, at present, the algorithm seems to be less sophisticated than Google’s more general search algorithm.

What I mean by this is that you need to ‘tell’ Google much more simplistically what the content on the page is about in order for relevant content to be extracted.

Say two companies sold chocolate and had both written blogs about the best chocolates. Company A might have written a great, detailed post, entitled “Wonderful chocolates of the world”, with a paragraph for each chocolate. However, Company B might have produced a less well-written blog, but which was better optimised for extraction, and therefore got the answer box. Something with a title like “The 10 most popular chocolates in the world”, then each chocolate in the list numbered.

Google would be much more likely to extract the list from Company B than Company A – because they had made it a lot easier for Google to work out what the content was about and that it was indeed right for an answer box.

Here’s a checklist of copy edits you should try and make:

  • Edit the title of your blog so it includes pointers to Google – words like ‘how to’ are key here
  • For numbered lists, use the H2 heading for the list title, and edit titles for clarity
  • Simplify list numbering (i.e. use “1.” rather than “1)” or “1:”)
  • Write copy which clearly tells Google that ‘this is an answer’ – sentences beginning “here’s how to”, “should consider” and even the cheesy “read on” appear to be especially effective
  • Write a short title or introductory sentence which includes your keyword, immediately before the paragraph, the list or the table
  • For paragraph extractions, make sure all of your definition is in standard paragraph sized copy

How I did this

It took a couple of weeks of tinkering to get my answer box back. My original change, which got us the first, fleeting answer box was to change the list titles from H3 to H2.

However, it took a little more digging online and testing to come across the “here’s how to” formula and add this just before the list began. I changed the copy, and this seemed, eventually, to convince Google that this answer box was a going concern. I also edited the length of the titles so they were shorter and easier to read.

As a final note, I also changed the blog’s title to include ‘How to’ at the beginning.

See below for the answer boxes side by side. The one on the left was my original, short-lived answer box, the one on the right is my more durable answer box. Note the change in the title of the blog, edits to the list titles and the new “Here’s how” line.

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Google answer box

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Google answer box

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Want a Google answer box for your website?

Getting an answer box for your keywords can lead to a significant boost in traffic to your website. We work with a lot of technology companies in the Microsoft Partner Network, and it strikes us that many are seriously missing a trick.

Let’s look at just a couple of obvious search terms screaming out for an answer box:

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Google answer box

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Google answer box

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Google answer box

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Google answer box

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Fifty Five and Five are a full-service digital marketing agency, guiding clients through the entirety of the content process—from ideation and creation to distribution and analytics. For more information, get in touch with us today.

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Google are rolling out a Mobile First Index: Is your site ready?

  • Google announces roll out of its Mobile First index algorithm.
  • The update will focus on mobile site versions over desktop versions.
  • Mobile optimised websites will see a boost in organic rankings.

It’s no secret that we’re in the age of mobile, and following the much-anticipated release of “Mobilegeddon,”—Google’s Mobile Friendly Update—search has, quite literally, gone mobile. But what can we expect from these changes?

Back in November 2016, the Google Webmaster Central Blog announced they were dipping their toes into its mobile-first index, with the intention of a global roll out.

As it stands currently, 60% of searches are made from our mobile devices. It makes sense, then, that Google have begun to give priority to sites that are optimized for phones, tablets and any other pocket rocket connected to the nearest Wi-Fi connection.

Until now, website organic SERPs (Search Engine Ranking Position) would be influenced by their SEO, backlinks and quality of content. With the mobile-first index, Google will crawl and then index content that is deemed ‘mobile friendly.’

So, what happens now?

Well, Google will be rolling out this change over the next few months, so no need to panic just yet. However, to make sure that you’re ready for the mobile-first index, there are a number of things that you should consider in the meantime:

1. We’re consuming content on small screens in smaller spaces

With 8 million passenger journeys on the London Underground daily, and 4.3 million people riding the New York subway every day, the way blogs are digested has changed. When you’re looking at your well-constructed marketing content strategy, it might be worth considering what type of content you’re creating. Does it fit well on a mobile screen? Is it easy to access from anywhere?

2. Is your content triggering more senses?

The power of touch screen and assisted touch has pushed content into a new era of interaction. With multiple phone and touch gestures, generating interest and leads is now possible at the touch of a button. If you haven’t already, it might be time to move ‘Calls to Action’ to the top of your next meeting agenda. Basically, your Calls to Action need to offer more than a ‘contact us’ with a link to an email address. Make it easy and engaging for readers to register their interest.

3. People are here for a good time, not a long time

Our attention spans have fallen to eight seconds and it’s looking like that that trend may continue. Here’s a gif of guinea pigs sharing a piece of grass to keep you and your attention span focused.

Mobile first index

The internet generation is a tough crowd to please. It’s therefore key that your website gives your audience what they want, and fast. Having a fast website is no longer just desirable—it’s essential. If your website loads fast and London underground and New York subway riders can consume your content pretty much instantly, then you’re off to a good start. By using Maya, not only can you get a speed measurement for your mobile site, but you’ll know which areas to improve.

4. The GoogleBots are coming

As we’re now all used to, Google sends its bots to crawl your website to determine your organic rankings. If you’ve put in all the ground work to optimize and perfect your mobile site, let Google know! I’d recommend using the Google TXT testing tool to verify that Googlebots can access your mobile site.

5. Users are only responding to responsive

With so much talk of the rise of mobile, it’s unlikely that your site isn’t responsive (your website works across multiple devices). However, if your site only works on desktop, then you need to ensure that your site has responsive design ASAP! If your site works on mobile and desktop, it’s unlikely that you’ll need to make many changes come the Mobile-First index rollout.

Over the next few months, we’ll all see the search results that Google recommends for us are becoming a lot more mobile friendly. Now is the time for you to not only optimize your sites for mobile, but welcome the GoogleBots to your site with open arms (and links) to improve your chances of getting the best index and ranking.

Is your website mobile ready? If not, you have work to do.

Content and Code Case Study

Content and Code A marketing strategy that aligns with Microsoft.

Microsoft experts and a trusted partner

Having won or been a finalist for Microsoft’s coveted Partner of the Year award for the last 9 years, Content and Code have been at the forefront of championing Microsoft technologies for the past decade. Founded 14 years ago, they boast a deep understanding of SharePoint, Office 365 and the entire Microsoft landscape to enhance their professional services.

Content and Code Case Study

An agency that understands the audience

When we first spoke to Tim, founder of Content and Code, he was looking for an agency to take some copywriting off his hands. As our relationship has progressed, we have broadened our offering to include a wider variety of services.

The work we have done for Content and Code has covered a number of specific sectors:

    • Construction
    • Healthcare
    • Finance and banking

Working closely alongside Content and Code, Fifty Five and Five now provide full digital marketing services. From initial generation of content ideas to SEO and social sharing, we are there every step of the way to ensure content is fresh and always geared towards the right audience.

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CPS case study

CPS A cutting-edge web presence for a leading partner.

A leading Microsoft Gold Partner

Founded in 1995, CPS pride themselves on using integrated, joined-up solutions to help businesses the world over, earning them a coveted Microsoft Partner of the Year Award for 2016. As one of the leading Microsoft Partners, they know that an attractive and user-friendly website is of the utmost importance… yet it remained an area of need. A modern website overhaul – involving re-design, content and SEO – provided CPS with a slick and unified home for their services to mirror the core values of the company.

CPS case study

Design, build, content & SEO

CPS asked us to help them revamp their web presence to better reflect their updated brand. A modern overhaul met the company’s desire for a more content-focused approach to marketing: with revamped landing pages, interactivity, blogs and social sharing. As well as handling the design, information architecture and build work, we also provided CPS with fresh content to fill these new pages. Furthermore, we optimised all content for specific SEO keywords to enhance the visibility of the CPS website.

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Google Penguin 4.0 update

Winter is coming: Google rolls out Penguin 4.0

  • Google announces latest update since 2012, Penguin 4.0
  • Penguin 4.0 to become more page specific and granular
  • Google penalties will affect specific pages rather than the whole site

As Summer finally draws to a close and it starts getting a little colder, it seems Google may be starting to feel the chill. After almost 2 years, the company are rolling out another Penguin update to further boost search results.

This is the fourth update for the algorithm, and Google Penguin 4.0 will be ‘real time’.

First released back in 2012, Penguin was designed to catch and penalize any sites that were considered ‘spammy’ – in other words, any sites that may bulk buy their links to try and improve their Google rankings. Sites found on the wrong side of this categorisation may be suffering from the ‘blow’ for 2 years.

This latest release of Google Penguin 4.0 will be real time; Google will crawl and reindex pages constantly, meaning that pages will be caught up or freed on a regular basis. In the latest blog post, Google said:

"With this change, Penguin's data is refreshed in real time, so changes will be visible much faster, typically taking effect shortly after we re-crawl and re-index a page. It also means we're not going to comment on future refreshes."

Penguin 4.0 will also see Google become more page specific and granular. Rather than affecting the whole site, Google will adjust its rankings and penalties to specific pages on the site.

Furthering on from this announcement, Google said that as the updates are a constant process, it will no longer confirm future updates. They have not confirmed if Penguin 4.0 is fully live, but we suspect that it won’t be long until the updates are noticeable soon.

In the mean time, get in touch if you need help with your inbound marketing and SEO.


Rencore Case Study

Rencore In depth content, SEO and marketing services.

Putting clarity at the core

Aiming to bring transparency to the SharePoint and Office 365 development process, Rencore’s dedication to optimising Microsoft’s two biggest platforms is reflected in their name. Stemming from the Swedish word “ren” – standing for clarity and clearness – and the English “core”, Rencore is home to internationally recognised developers, Microsoft MVPs and MCMs.

Rencore Case Study

Content and SEO

We work with Rencore on their website and blog SEO requirements, deploying a wide range of techniques focused on pushing great content up search engine rankings. The results speak for themselves, and we have been able to get Rencore’s website and blog articles ranking highly on Google for targeted keywords.

We employ classic SEO techniques, such as optimising content for keywords, using titles and images appropriately and ensuring content style, length and language meet optimal search engine requirements. We also help to push content towards community influencers, using social networks and relationship building techniques to promote the organic sharing of content.

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